Resource & Reference


Here is the only laundromat I found (actually my friend found) which does regular washing beside dry cleaning. In USA, laundromats are everywhere,  but good luck finding such in Sarajevo. 

I moved into this apartment in Koševko Brdo which did not have a washing machine. So for a few months, i had to hand wash my clothes. After  a month, my friend found this laundromat near my apartment, on the same street with the big super market, Robot. I dropped of my sheets this morning.  Cost 3KM. (Will post detailed prices later.)

 Hemijska  Čistionica IC
Ciglane, Hakije Kulenovića 30

061 523 016 

Open Mon to Fri from 8 to 22, Sat from 8 to 16.

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righCOPY 
Ferhadija 33
033 237 133
061 211 541

http://www.rightcopy.ba
rightcopy@rightcopy.ba 

Open: 8 to 20  Mon to Fri, 9 to 16 on Sat, and 10  to 15 on Sun.

I paid 30KM for a book with 450 pages.  

1. Is there still war?
No. It ended in 1995.

2. So now you live in Yugoslavia?
No. Yugoslavia is the old name of the 6-state union before they broke up and declared independent. Montenegro is the last. Yugoslavia is still used though, mostly to refer the country Serbia.

3. How do the Bosnians look like? Do they look European, blond hairs and blue eyes? (believe me, I was asked once.)
There is nothing homogeneous about Bosnian looks. You turn your eyes to this corner to see an typical European light-colored hairs and blue/green eyes. Turn your head once more and you will see dark Oriental looking people. Unlike American or Western Europeans with many different immigrant groups, thus justify the difference in their looks, these people are just Bosnian.

4. I heard about land mine.
True. But if you don’t wander off the beaten path and travel with tourist guides, then you are fine. If you just spend time in the center of Sarajevo, you have no thing to worry about. I admit that land mine was one of the thing which bugged me the most. I wanted to go to nearby villages on the mountain, but the guide book warned about land mines. It bugged the hell out of me.

5. What about tourist traps?
This city is not swarmed by tourists (maybe because these people try to stay away from the war zone, lol.) They flock to the close-by Croatia’s seaside, I guess.

6. So Sarajevo is a city of Muslims. Is it safe?
Yes an no. It happens that the majority of the population are Muslims. Safe or not safe has nothing to do with a Muslim-dominated, so it is as safe as other metropolitan European cities can get.

7. Is it safe for women traveling alone?
My roommate walked home from her school late at night all the time, and so did I from work. I asked the local about rapes, but she said it was extremely rare. (I am not so sure whether this has anything to do with Muslim’s culture)

8. What about pickpoketting?
Every local warned me to be extra careful with my bags as there were many whose bags got stolen. I am lucky so far.

9. Is the water drinkable?
Public water here is pure and drinkable; you can feel safe to save those extra bucks on water. Read my post about drinking water here.

10. What about visas?
EU citizens do not need a visa to enter BiH nor do American and Canadian citizens. But double check before you go.

11. What language spoken over there?
Bosnian. Read more

All embassies are in Sarajevo.

Austria: Dzidzikovac 7;
tel: 033 279 400; fax: 033 668 339
sarajewo-ob@bmaa.gv.at

Bulgaria: Soukbunar 15;
tel: 033 668 191; fax: 033 668 182
possar@bih.net.ba

Canada: Grbavicka 4/2;
tel: 033 222 033, fax.: 033 222 044;
sjevo@international.gc.ca

China: Brace Begic 17;
033 215 102; fax: 033 215 108

Croatia: Mehmeda Spahe 16;
tel: 033 444 330/1; fax: 033 472 434;
croemb.sarajevo@mvp.hr
Consular Section: Skenderija 17;
033 442 591; fax: 033 650 328
Part I.p65 2.2.2005, 14:18 47 48 SARAJEVO

Czech Republic: Franjevacka 19;
tel: 033 447 525, 033 446 966; fax: 033 447 526
czechemb@bih.net.ba

Denmark: Splitska 9;
tel: 033 665 901; fax: 033 665 902
sjjamed@un.dk

Egypt: Nurudina Gackica 58;
tel: 033 666 498; fax: 033 666 499
eg.em.sa@bih.net.ba

France: Mehmed-bega Kapetanovica Ljubusaka 18;
tel: 033 668 149, 033 668 151; fax: 033 212 186

Germany: Mejtas-Buka 11-13;
tel: 033 275 000, 033 275 080; fax: 033 652 978,

Greece: Obala Maka Dizdara 1;
tel: 033 213 439; fax: 033 215 032

Hungary: Hasana Bibera 53;
tel: 033 205 302; fax: 033 268 930;
hung.emb@bih.net.ba
Consular Section: Safet-bega Basagica 58a

Iran: Obala Maka Dizdara 6;
tel: 033 650 210; fax: 033 663 910

Italy: Cekalusa 39;
tel: 033 203 959; fax: 033 659 368 ambasara@bih.net.ba
Rizaha Stetic bb (info 13:30-14:30)

Japan: Mula Mustafe Baseskije 2;
tel: 033 209 580; fax: 033 209 583
japanbih@bih.net.ba

Libya: Tahtali sokak 17;
tel: 033 200 621; fax: 033 663 620
libia@bih.net.ba

Macedonia: Splitska 57;
tel/fax.: 033 206 004,

Malaysia: Trnovska 6;
tel: 033 201 578; fax: 033 667 713
mwsrjevo@bih.net.ba

Malta: Mula Mustafe Baseskije 12;
tel/fax: 033 668 632;

Netherlands: Grbavicka 4, I sprat;
tel: 033 223 404, 033 223 411; fax: 033 223 413
nlgovsar@hotmail.com

Norway: Ferhadija 20;
tel: 033 254 000; fax: 033 666 505
embsar@nfa.no

Pakistan: Emerika Bluma 17;
tel: 033 211 836; fax: 033 211 837
parepsarajevo@yahoo.com

Palestine: Cemerlina 4;
tel: 033 272 700/1; fax: 033 238 677
palesambih@yahoo.com

Poland: Dola 13;
tel: 033 201 142; fax: 033 233 796
amsar@bih.net.ba

Portugal: Cobanija 12/I;
tel: 033 200 835; fax: 033 443 117
embaport@bih.net.ba

Romania: Tahtali sokak 13 ;
tel: 033 207 447; fax: 033 668 940
rumunska@bih.net.ba

Russia: Urijan Dedina 93-95;
tel: 033 668 147; fax: 033 668 148

Saudi Arabia: Kosevo 44;
tel: 033 211 861; fax: 033 212 204
e.k.sa.a@bih.net.ba

Slovenia: Bentbasa 7;
tel: 033 271 260; fax: 033 271 270; 204 318
vsa@mzz-dkp.gov.si

Spain: Cekalusa 16;
tel: 033 278 560; fax: 033 278 582
embaspa@bih.net.ba

Serbia and Montenegro: Obala Maka Dizdara 3a;
tel: 033 260 080; fax: 033 221 469
yugoumpa@bih.net.ba

Sweden: Ferhadija 20;
tel: 033 276 030; fax: 033 276 060
ambassaden.sarajevo@foreign.ministry.se

Switzerland: Josipa Stadlera 15;
tel: 033 275 850; fax: 033 570 120

Turkey: Hamdije Kresevljakovica 5;
tel: 033 445 260; fax: 033 443 190
turska@bih.net.ba
Part I.p65 2.2.2005, 14:18 48 THE COUNTRY 49

United Kingdom: Tina Ujevica 8;
tel: 033 282 200; fax: 033 666 131;282 203
britain@bih.net.ba
Consular Section: Petrakijina 11;
tel: 033 208 229; fax: 033 204 780

United States of America: Alipasina 43;
tel: 033 445 700; fax: 033 659 722; 221 837

Vatican: Pehlivanusa 9;
tel: 033 551 050 ; fax: 033 207 863

Internet Club Click
Kundurdžiluk 1 (in the center, across from hotel Astra)
033 236 914

Open:
Everyday: 9 a.m. – 11 p.m.
Sunday: 10 a.m. – 10 p.m.
Cost: 1km/20 mins

Virtual Spot
Petrakijna br. 6
061 198 928
033 200 599
virtual@bih.net.ba
vspot@lol.ba http://www.v-spot.ba

Open every day from 9 to 23
Cost:
1 hour – 2KM
3 hour – 5KM
5 hour – 8KM
10 hour – 15KM
50 hour – 65KM
100 hour – 100KM
(I think this internet shop offers the best deal.)

Internet Cafe Cyber
Uyun Komerc
Open: 7 – 11
Cost: 1KM/20 mins
(on the street across Mula Mustafe Bašeskje, the street behind the Cathedral)

ZemZem
Mula Mustafe Bašeskje 61
033 239 648
061 804 200
Cost: 1KM/20 mins

Gemini Internet Cafe
Šenoina 16
(cross street Mašala Tita) Open every day from 8 to 11

e-Agent
29 Brace Begic (Kosevko Brdo, across from the Chinese embassy)

Open everyday except Sunday: 10 a.m. – 11 p.m.

Cost: 1km/30 mins

Economics Faculty
Trg Oslobodan 1

The computers in the hallway are for students and staff members, and you need codes to log on. If you need the internet for urgent information and all other interet clubs and cafe close, perhaps you can try your luck here. Hopefully someone is nice enough to lend you the code.

 

British Council
see my other post

BuyBook bookstore
Radiceva 4
Sarajevo
Tel: +387 33 206 545
Fax: +387 33 206 545

http://www.buybook.ba/
buybook@pksa.com.ba

It also has a cafe bar inside.

notes about buybook

Knjizara Šahipašić
Mula Mustare Bašeskve
033 220 112
Mon – Sat: 9 – 10
Sun: 10 – 14
(they have book and CD to learn Bosnian, but it costs 128KM)

Šahipašić
Vladislava Skarića 8
Mon – Sat: 9 – 21
www.this-is.org

First of all, Serbians, Croatians, and Bosnians speak the same language. Before the war 1991-1995, this language was called Serbo-Croatian. After the war, there was minor changes, and the language was called Bosnian.

And this will cause you some troubles if you want to buy books, CDs, audios materials for
learning Bosnian. When I was in the US, I searched libraries and discount websites for Bosnian learning materials. I came up with almost empty. Instead there are many learning Croatian items for much cheaper prices.

So I left for Sarajevo without even a small dictionary in my bag. For the first few weeks, I could not help kicking myself discovering that the Croatians and Bosnians speak and write the exact same language. If there are any differences, they are the sort of differences between American English and English English.

There are books here of course, but they are a bit pricy compared to those sold in America.


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